Take the Pledge!

OCTOBER is the international Breast Cancer Awareness month and what better way to show your support for women fighting cancer than by donating from your own hair to help them cope better with the harsh side effects of chemotherapy? 

One Wig Stand in collaboration with L’Oreal Professionnel are organizing a special hair donation event at City Centre Beirut, teaming up with top L’Oreal hair stylists for an afternoon of free cuts and styling for all who wish to donate.

We have some special surprises also planned for all who make the cut that day. Feel free to spread the word to friends and family who may be interested!

If you’ve made the cut recently and want to drop off your hair donation that day, please do!

MTC2_owsblog_graphicEVENT DETAILS
Date: Sunday, October 19, 2014
Venue: City Centre Beirut – Galleria Level (L0)
Time: 2pm – 8pm
To book your spot, call us on: 79-158471
Please come with pre-washed hair.

City Centre Beirut
Hair & More
Kellogg’s Special K
Merlun Group
RTB: Ready to Broadcast
Sakr Printing

Minimum Length: 20 cm
Type of Hair: Wavy or curly hair is completely acceptable so long as it is in good condition (not dried out or damaged).
Colored Hair: Even if your hair is colored and/or with highlights, it might still be used unless it has been bleached. Bleached hair is more apt to break during the wig-making process, and as such, preferably avoided.
Grey Hair: No more than 5% grey please as grey hair becomes fragile during processing and may not absorb color as well.

How many centimeters are you planning to donate? Select the number of centimeters from this album and post it on your Facebook, Twitter or Instagram to represent your goal. This is a great encouragement for friends and family to also take part!


For more information and donation guidelines, please visit: 

If you are or know a cancer patient in need of a wig for her treatment, we are here to help. Contact us on 79-158471 or to set a meeting and find the right match.


Hope Not Fear: Finding the Silver Lining

Most women dread losing their hair and having to wear a wig during their treatment. It’s really hard to accept losing such an integral part of your appearance and femininity – even if temporary. An added concern is how others will perceive that hair loss and treat you as a result of it. To add a fresh perspective to this important and sensitive subject, we conducted an interview with Cheri who we first met a few days.

What stood us for us immediately upon meeting Cheri is her refreshing attitude to wearing wigs, adding her own creative approach to making the experience more fun in light of a difficult situation. She shares all about her diagnosis, the daily ups and the downs, on her blog “Hope Not Fear“.

A strong woman worth getting to know a little further, here’s our interview with Cheri and we hope it inspires you as much as it inspired us:

  • Tell us a little a bit about yourself and your blog.

My name is Cheri Lewis. I am 38 years old and I live on Vancouver Island in British Columbia, Canada. I am happily married to an amazing, supportive man. We have no children, but we have 2 dogs (who are like my children).

In July 2012, I was diagnosed with breast cancer.

I created my blog “Hope Not Fear” to keep my friends and family updated on my journey. It’s been a way to share with the world all the good and the bad. It allows me to express how I’m feeling throughout my fight. I hope that by sharing my journey, I can help others fighting their own battles find hope, stay positive and realize they are not alone in this.

  • How did you react when you were first diagnosed with breast cancer?

When I was 20 years old, the University of British Columbia approached my family to do some genetic research on our blood line because my family has had a large number of breast and ovarian cancer cases (going back generations). They ended up finding a mutated gene in our blood line: the BRCA gene. This was an amazing discovery as now women all over the world can get tested for this gene to know how high a risk they have in getting breast and/or ovarian cancer.

I tested positive for both BRCA 1 & 2 –  which is breast and ovarian. I had the option of removing my breasts and ovaries at that time but as I was only 21 years old, I wasn’t ready to make that kind of decision. I was screened every 6 months through mammograms and MRIs after that.

Although I knew for several years that I had an increased likelihood of getting cancer, nothing could quite prepare me for the day my doctor informed me that I had breast cancer.

I stayed composed at first (perhaps it hadn’t really set in) and asked lots of questions: “What was our next step?” “How far had it progressed?” etc. It wasn’t until my sister hugged me that I broke down in tears.

The weeks and months that followed seemed unreal. I was mostly in a daze. The scariest part for me was when I had my first appointment with my chemotherapy oncologist. After discussing my options, he started explaining survival rates. The numbers and reality of the situation really hit home that day. This shocked and scared me because not once before did I think I wouldn’t survive this. But I will survive this.

Cheri meeting with surgeons following her diagnosis (Image Source: Hope Not Fear)

Cheri meeting with surgeons following her breast cancer diagnosis (Image Source: Hope Not Fear)

I choose to stay positive. I really believe that positivity and hope cures all. If your thoughts are negative, your body will not respond as well to treatment. I was given this life because I am strong enough to live it!

  • For many women, a big fear upon hearing that they have to do undergo chemotherapy is the impending hair loss. Was that of particular concern to you?

Yes – I think it is a HUGE concern for every woman.

It seems silly that hair would be the biggest concern. They inform you of the many other scary side-effects, like sores in the mouth, menopause, finger nails lifting-off (the list goes on and on), but the one that sucks the most is the hair loss.

Many people have said to me “It’s just hair, no big deal…” – I don’t see them shaving their heads. They also say “It’ll grow back” – yes, eventually it will but going through all the emotional turmoil that comes with being diagnosed with cancer and then having that somewhat-alien reflection in the mirror reminding you everyday [that you’re sick] is very challenging.

For men, it is also different. Many men live daily with a shaved or bald head. They wouldn’t really get looked twice, but when people see a bald woman, they instantly see a cancer patient and I don’t like the look of pity in their eyes.

Don’t pity me: I am a warrior and shaving my head was just a part of preparing for battle.

  • Have you been able to go bald in public since starting treatment?

Only my close friends and family have seen me bald. At home, I don’t wear a wig or scarf, but if someone I don’t know that well comes over, I will throw something on my head. It’s more for them not to feel awkward than for me.

A few days after I’d shaved my head and completed my second chemo treatment, I went out to lunch with my sister. I hadn’t purchased any wigs yet and was just wearing a toque. Then, we started talking about exposing my bald, pale, shiny head to the whole restaurant. We giggled about it but I got so nervous!

It was funny how I could be brave enough to battle cancer but too afraid to show my bald head to strangers in public.

After a few more silly, nervous giggles and a few deep breaths, my sister counted to three and I removed my toque. I sat through my entire lunch bald. I felt more empowered than ever that day because I had conquered a fear. I felt that I can really do anything!

  •  You recently shared photographs of yourself with the different wigs that you’re wearing during this period, each reflecting a different side of your personality (or so we presumed). How did you choose these wigs and how many do you currently own?

At first, I purchased two high-quality wigs from a local wig shop. I wanted some expert advice on fit, comfort and to have different options to choose from. “Ginger” is synthetic; what you see is what you get. She cannot be styled. I chose her because of the fun color.

All the other wig options in the shop were pretty “safe” styles, and in my perspective, boring (I have always had fun with my hair). “Mary-Anne” was my splurge – she wasn’t cheap. She is 100% real human hair. I can wash, curl, flat-iron, cut and color it – anything I could do if I still had my own hair.

I purchased four more wigs online from Hair Sisters. This was the only website I found with some fun, funky-styled wigs that were also very reasonably-priced. I wasn’t sure how “real” these wigs would look as they are synthetic and sometimes synthetic hair can be very shiny (plastic-looking). Even if they look a little more “fake” than my more expensive wigs, they are fun with wild colors so that’s fine.

I have many options now. If you could see my closet and my huge selection of shoes, you would understand my need for more than a few hair choices.

Source: Hope Not Fear

Some of Cheri’s wigs and their personas (Image Source: Hope Not Fear)

Anything that can bring excitement and fun to a scary situation is worth it.

Rather than be sad about facing my day in public, I get to have some fun deciding which “personality” I wish to wear that day. Each wig is a personality and a piece of my own personality.

  • Which one’s your favorite? And why?

Mmm… I’m not sure. I really like them all!

I would have to say it’s a tie between “Ginger” and “Mona”. My friends and family love “Ginger” the most. They request I wear her the most but sometimes she is a hassle as her hair is pretty long and tends to get tangled up. On the other hand, “Mona” is a super-short style so she’s very easy to wear and never gets in the way. I can wear big scarves around my neck without having it compete with the hair.

Image Source

Cheri, second from the left, is wearing “Ginger” here (Image Source: Hope Not Fear)

I have had random strangers compliment me on these two wigs, asking who my hairdresser is because they love the cut and color. I have them all fooled!

  • How do you decide which one you’ll wear each day?

Having so many choices is sometimes a bad thing. It makes it harder to decide.

Sometimes it depends on the weather conditions: wind and rain can reek havoc on certain wigs. It also depends on my outfit for the day, where I’m going and what I’m doing. For example, “Ginger” being the fun red color that she is, can clash with certain outfits. If I am hosting a dinner, I stick to my shorter styles as I don’t want to have a fire hazard attached to my head.

  • Has taking this approach helped you cope better with the physical side-effects of chemotherapy and the way you look? 

Yes, as I mentioned earlier, anything that makes you feel better when going through so much is definitely worth it. You can be seen in public and not get pitied just because you’re a cancer patient.

It’s also exciting to choose a style for each day.

Getting complimented on your “hair” is therapeutic in a strange way.

  • Would you encourage other women to do the same? And why?

Definitely if it helps them feel better but to each her own. Some women embrace “the bald” and feel powerful – like that day I went bald in the restaurant. I felt powerful too, but for me, that was more of a hurdle to cross. I may do it again one day.

In my case, feeling a little more “normal” on the outside makes me feel a little more “normal” on the inside too.

With my body going through so much because of the chemo, something as seemingly “trivial” or “vain” (to some) as hair, can be uplifting and fun, improving a crappy situation. When faced with a life-changing hurdle, try to make the best of it by finding a silver lining.

  • What advice would you give to a fellow breast cancer patient reading this?

My biggest advice is to choose hope, not fear.

Cheri's motto in her fight against breast cancer (Image Source: Hope Not Fear)

Cheri’s motto in her fight against breast cancer (Image Source: Hope Not Fear)

Being afraid is, of course, a natural first reaction. I have been there too, but fear is a cancer in and of itself. Being sad and afraid will not help you heal. At the same time, it is also o.k. to be angry sometimes and to have bad days but always remember that life is to short to wallow in sadness.

As horrible as cancer is, it has had a positive impact on my life. In the last few months, I have discovered more about myself than I ever thought I could. I don’t sweat the small things anymore. I now appreciate the little life experiences that I may have overlooked before. I am very thankful for myself, my strength and positivity.

My relationship with my husband has also grown much stronger than ever and I’m overwhelmed by the support of my friends and family. I have also made new friends (some I haven’t even met in person) with other warriors and survivors that have shared with me their battles. We’ve laughed about the coincidences and the humorous sides of chemo and reconstruction.

My final advice: Be strong. Stay strong. Lean on your loved ones. Be a warrior. Fight like a girl! Find the silver lining. Enjoy life. Don’t let this get you down. You were given this life because you are strong enough to live it.

If I can do it, so can you!

Follow Cheri’s journey on her blog “Hope Not Fear” and feel free to share with others who might benefit from her powerful message.


انا مش هينة

I know it’s been a while since I’ve shared any of my stories with you, but I just got back from another journey. For the past few months, I’ve been accompanying a new woman through her cancer treatment and couldn’t really leave her side until I knew she was ok. Now that she’s feeling much better and no longer really needs me (plus her hair has grown back), let me take this chance to share her story. By preparing for the worst upon hearing her diagnosis, I could tell her attitude was going to help her get through it. Cancer is scary but sometimes we give it more power than we should. It was a difficult phase in and of itself for her, but she also realized that it could be much worse and that she was stronger than she thought she was. “It’s good that it’s me and not my kids or husband.. I’m best to handle it” she told me one night. This strong maternal instinct allowed her to accept what was happening and not dwell on the detrimental “why me?”. One of the things she dreaded though was the hospital visits. I think it made her feel vulnerable and more sick than she was really feeling. No one likes hospitals if they’re a patient anyway, right? When she was diagnosed, word quickly spread. Everyone suddenly knew! It wasn’t something in her hands although she would have preferred to keep it private if only to not worry others about her condition. Sometimes it bothered her how people she didn’t speak to much before were suddenly concerned: “I don’t want people to just be there and ask about me when things are bad. Where were they when things were good but I also would have liked to have them in my life?” Even though everyone knew, she dealt with her treatment in privacy and even kept her children away so as not to deter their image of her during this frail period. Can you relate to this feeling? We didn’t take much turns with wearing the wig as I’d had with other women before her so it stayed on my head for most of her treatment. Definitely a first. When I asked her why, she said it was uncomfortable and weighed on her emotionally. The only time it really mattered for her to wear one was at her sister’s wedding so that she wouldn’t stand out. I saw some of the pictures and could barely tell she was wearing one. “انا مش هينة” which translated into English means “I’m tough” was her personal discovery along this journey. She said it with glowing pride and you could tell it was also an achievement for her. Right when our time was coming to a close, I asked her for some advice to pass on to the next women I meet along my journey. Her words? “Be cool. Life is harder than cancer. Just accept it as it is and remember, this is just another year. It will pass.”


The Different Sides of Poly (and Her Wigs)

Poly, a talented singer and songwriter making a huge bang in the Lebanese music scene, knows how to stand out. Besides her vivacious stage presence, you’ll seldom catch her without one of her funky wigs – even on a regular day when she’s not performing.

One Wig Stand took a few minutes from Poly’s busy schedule to conduct this small one-on-one interview to get to know her (and her wigs, of course) a little bit better:

Poly performing at DRM – December 2011 (Photo by Loryne Atoui)

1. What’s with all the wigs? Tell us about your obsession with wearing them.

First off, I want to say that my wigs are not natural.

For me the point of wearing a wig is not about trying to make people believe that I have natural, colorful, awesome, funky hair – I wear them literally because I can. I used to get bored with my hairstyles very easily. I think having braids was the only hairstyle that took months for me to get over, so instead of messing up my hair every week with new colors and cuts, I figured, why not wear wigs? That way I can change colors and cuts whenever I want.

My wigs are an expression of my moods or what I’m feeling that day.

That’s why I’m called Poly; I have different sides of me and I have a wig for each of those sides! The wig world is a limitless one.

2. When did you first start wearing wigs?

Less than a year ago when I took out my braids.

Poly, back in the braid days.. (Photo source: Poly’s Official Fan Page on Facebook)

3. How many wigs do you currently own?

Around 25, but I don’t always use all of them..

4. How do you choose which wig to wear during your performances?

To be honest, I rarely plan ahead when it comes to what I’m wearing, including the wig I’ll be wearing, which is something that really annoys my designer Farah Hourani! But I just want the way I look on stage to completely express the way I’m feeling that day (or week) so we usually grab a bunch of outfits and wigs and then we mix-and-match them backstage before the concert!

Experimenting with looks – Which wig will Poly wear today? :-) (Photo source: Poly’s Official Fan Page on Facebook)

5. Where do you purchase or get your wigs from?

I get my wigs from Hair & More in Sin El-Fil but I always find a way to recreate them or cut them. My friend, and co-songwriter, Carl Ferneine once decided to play around with my purple ponytail and made it into my fauxhawk.

6. How do you take care of the wigs?

I brush and wash them, but I don’t take care of them nearly as much as I should..

7. Do you have a wig stand?

Yes I do! Waking up next to plastic heads wasn’t very pleasant in the beginning so I had to move all my wigs and heads to what we now call “The Wig Room”.

8. How do others respond to your wearing wigs?

Mostly I get people asking me if the wig is natural or not, and my typical answer is “It never is.. ” Or I’ll get people asking me why I’m wearing wigs and where I get them from. The intense staring never gets old of course, but that doesn’t stop me from experimenting with my wigs and fashion.

Poly behind-the-scenes (Photo source: Poly’s Official Fan Page on Facebook)

9. Do you wear them on a daily basis outside of your performances or public appearances? If so, please share why.

I wear my wigs whenever I feel like it – which is 80% of the time. It’s not just for entertainment purposes. For me, it’s like wearing a funky hat, or an accessory. I love my natural brown curly hair but I just get bored.

And basically, why not?

10. Have you met others who wear wigs for other reasons (such as breast cancer patients) and can you now tell when someone is wearing a wig?

I actually haven’t met anyone in person that wears wigs (for any reason), but yes, sometimes I can tell when someone is wearing a wig.

Poly performing at DRM – December 2011 (Photo by Loryne Atoui)

Don’t let all the wigs intimidate you – Poly’s one of the sweetest performers you’ll ever meet. Not only is Poly a singer and fashionista, but she’s a passionate human rights activist who supports causes close to heart. Who knows? Perhaps our unified obsession with wigs might bring forth an interesting collaboration for breast cancer awareness with the up-and-rising star in the future!


Follow Poly on Twitter:


Follow Poly on Facebook:

Boys: Let’s talk about wigs!

“What does your husband or boyfriend think about wigs?” This search term somehow lead to our blog and got me thinking. That’s a good question to ask and we’re always curious to hear how men react to issues related to breast cancer.

Wearing a wig is a big concern for any women going through chemo. She worries how her husband or boyfriend will react and that he may not find her as attractive as before. We want to assure these women that a wig will not affect her beauty in her love’s eye. Plus the wig is temporary until your hair grows back.

BUT I’m sure hearing it from men themselves will make a stronger impact. Boys – we want to hear from you about this. Be honest (but gentle please). Your responses will provide great insight for any woman asking herself that question.. and that will hopefully also her mind too:

“What do you think of women in wigs and would you be turned off if your wife/girlfriend/lover had to wear one?”

Responses (you can also read them in the comments section below):

Tokenminds: A friend of mine had to wear a wig whilst taking treatment for breast cancer and I can honestly say I didn’t notice it was a wig until she pointed it out. If a partner was undergoing the same treatment the wig wouldn’t trouble me at all. Neither would a patchy or bald scalp. If you love someone, and are in love with them, you find them attractive.

Johnny: Having to wear a wig, especially for a woman, is a serious matter, and any man with a sense of decency, sensitivity or respect will understand this. If it were my wife, the idea of a wig would be the least of my worries, I’d be a lot more invested in trying to make her feel better and would be looking after her. If it were my girlfriend, then I would definitely look past it, because there is more to this girl I’m dating than her looks, otherwise I wouldn’t be in a relationship with her. Being understanding and loving in such a time is the least that you can do for your partner or your friend.

Quoting what Tokenminds said in his comment, “If you love someone, and are in love with them, you find them attractive” and so having to wear a wig would not be something to sway my image of her.


Here’s one post we came across on the similar topic: Click here.